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Matthew 8:28-34 – The Demon-possessed of the Gadarenes

|| Mark 5:1-20; Luke 8:26-37

MT8:28 When Jesus reached the other shore in the country of the Gadarenes[1] two demon-possessed [men] came out from among the memorial tombs[2] to met him. These [demoniacs] were unusually fierce and no one had the strength or courage to travel through that way. MT8:29 And, look! they shrieked, yelling, “What? – to us and you,[3] Son of The God? Did you come here to torment[4] us before the appointed time?”[5] MT8:30 (Far away from them was a feeding herd of swine.)[6] MT8:31 So, the demons entreated him, saying, “If you are going to exorcise us, send us into the herd of swine.” MT8:32 Jesus said to them, “Off with you!” Those exorcised went away into the swine; and, look! the entire herd ran down the precipice into the sea and they died in the waters. MT8:33 But those pasturing the herd fled into the city reporting everything involving the demon-possessed [men]. MT8:34 And, look! the entire city came out to confront Jesus and when they saw him they entreated him to leave their area.

[1] Gadarenes: Called “country of the Gerasenes” in other mss and Mark 5:1 and Luke 8:26.

[2] Memorial tombs: The Greek is MNEMEION and could be rendered “memorium” but generally rendered “tombs” and “burial places.” The same word occurs at John 5:28.

[3] What? – to us and you: A Hebraic phrase of disdain or contempt. It is variously rendered: NWT: what have we to do with you; RHM: what have we in common with thee; TCNT: what do you want with us; LAM: what business have we together; KNX: why dost thou meddle with us. Jesus used the same language with his mother when she appeared to either direct him or insist he perform a miracle (John chapter 2).

[4] Torment: The Greek is BASANISAI and though it is generally rendered this way as well as “torture” (GDSP) the idea is one of “punishment.” One may compare its use in the Jewish Greek LXX Ezekiel 32:24, 27, 30 where it is used of buried soldiers and their armament. The word group occurs 20 times in the Christian Bible. Regarding Matthew 18:34, The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia states: “Probably the imprisonment itself was regarded as ‘torment’ (as it doubtless was), and the ‘tormentors’ need mean nothing more than jailers.” (Edited by J. Orr, 1960, Vol. V, p. 2999)

[5] Before the appointed time: These demons were not then being tormented in some hell-fire. Their ultimate punishment will be “everlasting cutting off” in what Revelation calls “Second Death.” (Matthew 25:46; Revelation 20:14)

[6] Herd of swine: Jews were forbidden pork and raising them violated the Law of Moses (Leviticus 11:7; Deuteronomy 14:8). Compare the following regarding Jews and pork (Isaiah 65:4; 66:17; 1 Maccabees 1:63 and 2 Maccabees 6:18, 19; 7:1, 2). The Non-Jews consider pork a delicacy and doubtless these swine-herders sold their product to these.

The demons began to entreat Jesus saying, “If You are going to cast us out, send us into the herd of swine.” And Jesus said to them, “Go!” And they came out and went into the swine, and the whole herd rushed down the steep bank into the sea and perished in the waters.

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 8:1-4 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus a Miracle-working Son of God

Matthew 8:5-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Servant of Army Officer Healed

Matthew 8:14-17 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-law

Matthew 8:18-22 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Two Would-be Followers

Matthew 8:23-27 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus Calms a Stormy Sea

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Further reading

  1. Matthew 8:28-34
  2. Matthew 8:23-24 … bay of Pigs
  3. Escaping the Fear Factor
  4. August 13, 2017 The Gadarene Demoniac
  5. 6th Sunday of Luke: The Gadarene Demoniac
  6. Day 127 – the Gerasene Demoniac
  7. 14th October: Mark 4:1-6:13
  8. How could they not know?
  9. Meditation: Matthew 8:28-34
  10. Thoughts to Ponder from Amos 5:14-15, 21-24 and Matthew 8:28-34
  11. Maybe It’s All in the Telling
  12. Go then …
  13. What if people don’t want Jesus as king? (Matthew 8:28-34)
  14. Inconvenient Christianity
  15. Second Death (New heaven on earth)
  16. The Second Death: The Lake Of Fire And Brimstone
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Matthew 8:23-27 – Jesus Calms a Stormy Sea

|| Mark 4:35-41; Luke 8:22-25

MT8:23 Jesus’ disciples followed him as he embarked into the boat. MT8:24 And, look! a great disturbance[1] occurred in the sea and the boat was about to be swamped[2] by the [storm] waves. But Jesus was sleeping.[3] MT8:25 They approached Jesus and aroused him, saying, “Master, save us, for we are being destroyed!” MT8:26 And Jesus told them, “Why are you frightened,[4] you with little faith?”[5] Then he rose and rebuked the winds and the sea and a great calm occurred. MT8:27 But, these men wondered, saying, “What kind of person[6] is this that the winds and the sea obey him?”

[1] A great disturbance: The Greek is SEISMOS MEGAS as in a shaking, a great earthquake.

[2] About to be swamped: The Greek is literally “covered” indicating the height of the waves. The Sea of Galilee is capable of great and sudden storms. Only a person who is been in such a storm realizes the range of emotions among these seasoned fishermen. They surely were used to foul weather.

[3] Sleeping: Imagine the Nazarene’s dreams in such slumber surrounded by danger.

[4] Frightened: The Greek is DEILOI and is variously rendered: DIA: timid, KJV: fearful; RIEU: cowards

[5] Little faith: Some render the phrase: PME: little-faiths.

[6] What kind of person: They never think he is God.

Jesus calms the storm

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:12-17 – Galilee Saw A Great Light

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 8:1-4 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus a Miracle-working Son of God

Matthew 8:5-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Servant of Army Officer Healed

Matthew 8:14-17 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-law

Matthew 8:18-22 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Two Would-be Followers

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Further reading

  1. Storm Coming In
  2. When the storm is rocking your boat
  3. Matthew 8:23-27
  4. When your life is threatened (Matthew 8:23-27)
  5. Calming the Storm
  6. Peace Be Still
  7. But It’s Impossible
  8. How much does love weigh?
  9. Prayer- Lord Save Us, We Are Going Down (Matthew 8.23-27)
  10. After the Storm

Matthew 8:18-22 – Two Would-be Followers

|| Luke 9:57-60

MT8:18 But when Jesus observed the crowd surrounding him he commanded [his disciples] to leave for the other side of [Lake Galilee]. MT8:19 And a scribe[1] approached Jesus, and said: “I will follow you anywhere you go.” MT8:20 Jesus told him, “Foxes[2] have dens and birds of the sky roasts,[3] but the Son of Humankind[4] has nowhere[5] to lay his head.” MT8:21 Then a different one of the disciples[6] said to Jesus, “Sir, permit me first to go and bury my father.”[7] MT8:22 But, Jesus told him, “Be following me[8] and let the dead bury their own dead.”[9]

[1] Scribe: The Greek is GRAMMATEUS, a grammarian, writer or copyist. The word occurs about 75 times in the Bible, beginning with Judges 5:14 (Compare 1 Chronicles 2:55; Ezra 4:8, 9, 17, 23). The group occur in Matthew, 22; Mark, 21; Luke, 14; John, 1; Acts, 3; 1 Corinthians, 1. The scribe may be learning or educated. The Hebrew sopherim were very dedicated to the precise hand-copying of the Scriptures. They counted not only the words but also the letters of the entire Hebrew Bible. They were associated with teachers of the Law and particularly the sect of the Pharisees. They could be called “Rabbi.” We would suspect their fingers blackened from much use of pen and ink. The older scribes much hunched over from labors and the penmanship table.

[2] Foxes: The animal lives in burrows underground which may be substantial. They are mentioned nine times in the Bible.

[3] Roasts: Note not “nests” but temporary places to spend the night.

[4] Son of Humankind: The Greek is HUIOS TOU ANTHROPOU and is most often rendered “Son of man.” There are several words for “man” and so we prefer to widen this word to mean “human” which may or may not include women as in “humankind” according to the context. The phrase is taken directly from Daniel 7:13 which was understood by the Jewish teachers to refer to the Messiah or even the Son of God (Compare Philo Judaea). The designation occurs about 180 times and is applied to Daniel and Ezekiel, most often in the Hebrew Bible to the latter prophet. The title occurs in Matthew, 31; Mark, 14; Luke, 25; John, 13; Acts, 1 and rarely elsewhere.

[5] Nowhere: Jesus has no permanent residence but is like Paul, “homeless.” (1 Corinthians 4:11) It is interesting to note when we see Jesus next sleeping: in the fishing boat during the storm. He is often seen spending the night outdoors even up to his final week. Such a person today would be considered a homeless street-person and shunned by genteel Christians.

[6] A different one of the disciples: Possibly one other than the twelve. It is interesting to note that this “disciples” wishes to “follow” Jesus. One might assume that is what being a disciple meant. It is possible the account means by this that the disciple wanted to become part of Jesus personal entourage which followed him everywhere.

[7] Bury my father: Many understand this to mean the disciple wished to return to his living father and wait until his death and burial and thereafter begin his following Jesus.

[8] Following me: Jesus does not include him among his closest disciples but encourages the man to continue to follow on this course.

[9] Dead bury their own dead: Those who are spiritually dead as children of Adam and have not taken up Nazarene discipleship. There were others who could bear this burden leaving the man free to follow if he so chose. Discipleship, particularly apostleship, were serious matters worthy of total commitment by a man. It is possibly the reason women were not invited to make this sacrifice, given their obligations as mothers.

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 8:1-4 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus a Miracle-working Son of God

Matthew 8:5-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Servant of Army Officer Healed

Matthew 8:14-17 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-law

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Additional reading

  1. A call easy to understand
  2. Discipleship to look at
  3. Discipleship way of life on the narrow way to everlasting life
  4. Breathing and growing with no heir
  5. Fellowship
  6. Salvation, trust and action in Jesus #3 as a Christian

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Further related

  1. Matthew 8:18-22
  2. Following Jesus…
  3. Discipleship
  4. the cost of discipleship
  5. The Cost of (Non) Discipleship
  6. The cost of discipleship, peace, and division

Matthew 8:14-17 – Jesus Heals Peter’s Mother-in-law

|| Mark 1:29-34; Luke 4:38-41

MT8:14 Upon arriving at Peter’s house[1] Jesus saw his mother-in-law[2] down with a burning fever. MT8:15 Jesus touched her[3] and the fever left her. She rose and began serving Jesus.[4] MT8:16 Now when evening arrived they brought to Jesus many demon-possessed[5] and he exorcised[6] the spirits[7] with a mere word; and those suffering badly he cured.[8] MT8:17 This [was done] so that spoken by Isaiah[9] the prophet might be fulfilled: “He took [upon himself] our sicknesses and our diseases he carried.” [Isaiah 53:4]

[1] Peter’s house: Possibly owned by Peter. It is also possible he later sold it to obey Luke 12:33 thus setting his example in Acts 2:44, 45; 4:34-37.

[2] Mother-in-law: Most understand that Peter was married as Paul later mentions (1 Corinthians 9:5). We are told nothing of Peter’s wife.

[3] Jesus touched her: Some of Jesus’ healings involved touch (Matthew 20:34).; others did not, as in the case of the centurion’s servant. Regarding Jesus’ touch (or, others touching him) see: Matthew 8:3, 15; 9:20, 21, 29; 14:36; 17:7; 20:34; Mark 1:41; 3:10; 5:27; 6:56; 7:33; 8:22; 10:13; Luke 5:13; 6:19; 7:14, 39; 8:44; 18:15; 22:51.

[4] Serving Jesus: That is, showing hospitality as in preparing food and drink. We wonder what goes through her mind.

[5] Demon-possessed: The Greek is DAIMONI-ZOMENOUS and is also rendered: WEY: demoniacs; KJV: possessed with devils; BAS: had evil spirits. The word occurs ten times only in the Synoptic Gospels.

[6] Exorcised: The Greek is EXEBALEN and is variously rendered: KJV: cast out; NOR: drove out; KIT: threw out (Compare Matthew 9:33; Mark 1:34; 16:9).

[7] Spirits: The Greek is PNEUMATA and is rendered “demons” by some (MON).

[8] Cured: The Greek is ETHERAPEUSEN and may be translated “healed.” The word occurs three dozen times in the Gospels.

[9] Isaiah: That is Isaiah 53:4. Isaiah is quoted by name 21 times (Matthew, 5; Mark, 2; Luke, 2; John, 4; Acts, 3; Romans, 5). 1 Peter 2:24 alludes to this same verse.

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 8:1-4 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus a Miracle-working Son of God

Matthew 8:5-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Servant of Army Officer Healed

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Additional reading

  1. Oh god, this is never going to end!
  2. Commemorating the escape from slavery

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Further reading

  1. Day 12 – Unwavering faith
  2. Matthew 8 (When life takes flight)
  3. Jesus is not only our Redeemer, He is also our Master
  4. Though He Delay, He Will be Faithful
  5. Experiencing Jesus’s Touch
  6. That special touch. Blog 12-2017
  7. Jesus, Thursday November 16, AD 29

Matthew 8:5-13 – Servant of Army Officer Healed

|| Luke 7:1-10; John 4:46-53

MT8:5 Entering Capernaum a centurion[1] approached Jesus begging him MT8:6 saying, “Sir, my servant-boy[2] is house-bound, a paralytic, in terrible agony.” MT8:7 Jesus told him, “When I arrive I shall[3] cure him.” MT8:8 But the centurion replied: “I am unfit[4] to have you enter under my roof; but only say the word and my servant-boy will be healed. MT8:9 For I am a man in a position of authority with many soldiers under me. And I tell this one, ‘Get up and go,’ and he goes; and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes. And to my own slave,[5] ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” MT8:10 Hearing this Jesus marveled and told those following him, “I tell you this truth,[6] I tell you, I have never discovered such faith[7] in all of Israel![8] MT8:11 But, I tell you that many from sunrise to sunset[9] will come and recline with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob[10] in the Realm of the Heavens, MT8:12 but the sons of the kingdom[11] will be cast out into the outer darkness, and there they will weep and grind their teeth.”[12] MT8:13 And then Jesus spoke to the centurion, “Be on your way: just as you believed,[13] let it happen to you.” And the servant-boy was healed in that very hour.

[1] Centurion: The word occurs ten times in the Christian Bible between Matthew and Acts. This Roman army officer was in charge of one hundred soldiers. Roman legions, despite the number of troops were divided into 60 centuries under the command of a centurion. This is an occupying soldier often disliked by the Jews. However, some Roman soldiers became quite favorable to the Jews, giving charitable gifts, and at least in one known case, built a synagogue. Compare a later centurion, Cornelius in Acts chapter 10 (Note John the Baptist’s suggestions to such soldiers at Luke 3:14).

[2] Servant-boy: The Greek is PAIS meaning “boy.” “Boy” is an old English word for a male slave or servant. “Girl” designated a female slave. “Boy” in certain racial contexts is derogatory in many cultures today. Some women object to “girl” because of its historical roots in slavery.

[3] I shall: Note our Lord’s confident faith.

[4] I am unfit: Actually Jews had little to do with Non-Jews and the “religious” among them had no dealings at all.

[5] Slave: This is a different Greek word than PAIS above – DOULO meaning a slave or servant. The word group “slave” occurs 400 times in the Bible, most often in the Christian Bible in Matthew and Luke. The first occurrence is Genesis 9:25 following the Flood. In Paul’s epistles the word “slave” is often applied as a designation for a disciple of the Nazarene. One of Paul’s letters, Philemon (verse 16), was written to a Christian slave owner.

[6] I tell you this truth: The literal Greek word is AMEN and is variously rendered: verily, solemnly, truly. The word usually precedes a sober statement.

[7] Faith: This is the second occurrence of the word “faith” in Matthew. The first was in the Sermon on the Mount at Matthew 6:30. The Greek is PISTIN and is usually translated by the Latin biased word “faith” or the old English bias word “belief.” Paul defines “faith” in Hebrews 11:1. The words “faith” and “believe” occur over 700 times in the Bible. The first occurrence is Genesis 15:6 in the case of the father of all the faithful, Abraham. The word occurs most often in the Letter to the Romans. The last occurrence deals with those lacking faith (Revelation 21:8).

[8] Such faith in all of Israel: This must have struck his disciples hard! Observers may already have been questioning the propriety of such contact with a Gentile, let alone an occupying soldier. And, then to be told this Roman centurion’s faith was so outstanding. How much basis did the centurion have to place his faith and trust in this carpenter from Nazareth? Surely the humble solider serves as an example two thousand years later?

[9] Sunrise to sunset: Or, east and west; orient and occident.

[10] Abraham and Isaac and Jacob: This verse has been very controversial with a variety of opinions. Some view it as evidence these ancient patriarchs would attain to heavenly life. Jesus repeats something similar in another context at Luke 13:29 where he amplifies the compass directions. Judging from Matthew 11:11, 12 these honorable forefathers would only equal John the Baptist who would not be a member of the Kingdom Realm of heaven. So, what may this verse mean? Judging from the context of Luke 13:29 it may be understood in this manner: The phrase “kingdom of the heavens” likely refers to the Realm of Profession (Christendom) over which the Lord Messiah reigns, that is, the Christian Church. The three patriarchs possibly stand as a symbol for the Jewish roots of those first members of Christ’s church/kingdom. As in that “root of fatness” which comprises the Olive Tree of Romans chapter 11. In the year 36 the first Gentile convert to Christianity joined the Church along with his family. This was the first to come to the spiritual table within that Realm of Christian Profession. Meanwhile the religious hypocrites found themselves outside in the darkness. Near the end of his ministry when Greeks wish to speak to them, Jesus assured that following his ascension he “would draw all kinds of men.” (John 12:20-32) The names of the patriarchs are used as synonyms for the nation of Israel [Abraham – Isaiah 29:22; Isaac, Amos 7:9; Jeremiah 33:26; Psalm 105:9. Jacob in particular is a cryptic for Israel – Psalms 14:7; 44:4; 47:4; 53:6; 59:13; 78:5, 21, 71; 79:7; 85:1; 87:2; 99:4; 105:10; 135:4; 147:19; Rachel is also used for all of Israel, Jeremiah 31:15]

[11] Sons of the kingdom: That is the Jews who were promised such a “kingdom of priests” upon their obedience to God’s covenant (Exodus 19:5, 6). Jesus uses the phrase only one other time in Matthew 13:38 as he applies it to the wheat class of Christians within “the kingdom of the heavens.” This kingdom is that of the Son, in which there prove to be the lawless. It contrasts with the Father’s Kingdom where the Saints will shine like the sun in glory (Matthew 13:41-43; Daniel 12:3).

[12] Grind their teeth: Note how this begins at Stephen’s martyrdom (Acts 7:54, 57).

[13] Believed: Or, conviction, trust, faith. The Greek is EPISTEUSAS.

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 8:1-4 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus a Miracle-working Son of God

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Further reading

  1. Are We a Kingdom of Priests?
  2. Israel will be a kingdom of priests “if” & decline in true church in USA
  3. “Assembling His Kingdom of Priest”
  4. You Were Chosen For A Divine Purpose
  5. How to Find Healing In a Sick World
  6. Healing Christ
  7. Prayer- Jesus, only speak the word (Matthew 8.5-11)

CHAPTER EIGHT:
JESUS HEALS, CONTROLS WEATHER,
EXPELS DEMONS

[A Miracle-Working Son of God]

Matthew 8:1-4 – Crowds Gather as Leper Cleansed

|| Mark 1:40-45; Luke 5:12-16

MT8:1 Great crowds followed Jesus when he came down from the mountain. MT8:2 And, look! a leper[1] approached Jesus and bowed to the ground,[2] prostrating himself at Jesus’ feet, saying, “Sir, if you are able and willing, cleanse me.” MT8:3 And, reaching out his hand Jesus touched the leper, saying, “I am willing. Be cleansed.” And immediately the man was cleansed of the leprosy. MT8:4 And Jesus told the leper, “See you tell no one[3] and [go] offer the [sacrificial] gift appointed by Moses[4] as a testimony to them.”

[1] Leper: Lepers and leprosy occur 20 times in the Hebrew Bible and 9 times in the Christian Bible.

[2] Bowed to the ground: The whole phrase is from the single Greek word PROSEKUNEI (before + kiss), inferring severe prostration and kissing the sandals of the respected one. The rendering with the word “worship” is misleading in modern English though not in King James English. Strong’s Greek Number 4352: from 4314 and a probable derivative of 2965 (meaning to kiss, like a dog licking his master’s hand). The word occurs 60 times in the KJV. It has the range of meaning: 1) to kiss the hand to (towards) one, in token of reverence; 2) among the Orientals, esp. the Persians, to fall upon the knees and touch the ground with the forehead as an expression of profound reverence; 3) in the NT by kneeling or prostration to do homage (to one) or make obeisance, whether in order to express respect or to make supplication; 3a) used of homage shown to men and beings of superior rank.

[3] See you tell no one: Several times Jesus tells a healed person this, usually with the opposite result – they go and tell everyone (Mark 1:44, 45; Luke 5:14, 15).

[4] Gift appointed by Moses: See Leviticus 14:1-32

File:Leprosy thigh demarcated cutaneous lesions.jpg

Hansens disease, leprosy. Depicts thigh with demarcated cutaneous lesions Source: US.departement of health and human services

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Preceding

Nazarene Commentary Matthew 4:23-25 – Kingdom Preaching and Healing Draws Crowds

Matthew 7:13-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #5 Matthew 7:28-29 – The Crowd’s Reaction

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Further reading

  1. Commentary on Matthew 8
  2. Unclean – Matthew 8:1-3
  3. Matthew 8 (When life takes flight)
  4. Matthew 8 (by A. Sorensen)
  5. ​Matthew 8:3 NIV
  6. Deuteronomy 33,34; Psalm 119:145-176; Isaiah 60; Matthew 8
  7. Lost and hurting? Drop the k

28 When Jesus finished his message, the crowds were astounded at how he taught. 29 He was instructing them authoritatively, not as their scribes. { translation}

Throughout the Messianic writings we come to hear how Jesus attracted people and how he let them think about the things they could see and hear.

The gospel writer Matthew wants the readers of his writings to know who he had met and why he became clinched so much to this man who he believed to be the sent one from God and the expected King.

The point of Matthew’s narrative is that we realize who Jesus is. He’s the king. He restores heaven’s reign over the earth. That is the gospel — the good news of the kingdom of heaven, with Jesus as heaven-appointed ruler. The culmination of Matthew’s Gospel is the announcement that Jesus has received all authority — in heaven and on earth (28:18-20). {Hearing the king (Matthew 7:28-29)}

It is by those given Messianic Writings people should come to know who Christ Jesus is. Nearly 2000 years later we must say still too many who call themselves Christian have not come to see who the Christ Jeshua really is.

Some of them may already have seen that Jesus is the anointed ruler and the long-awaited king from David’s line. But the majority of Christians still have not understood that Jesus is the sent one from God who restores the promised blessing of God’s reign to the nations (1:1).

More people should come to recognise that Jesus is the son of God who undoes the captivity of earthly powers (1:17). He is the one who received authority from God to be the divine ruler living among his people (1:23), the ruler who seems to be no one from nowhere (2:23). As the king (2:2) he’s the ruler who shepherds God’s people (2:6). From the writings people should come to know that Jesus is Jacob’s Star (2:10), the new exodus (2:15).   notices that is just the first two chapters of Matthew! {Hearing the king (Matthew 7:28-29)}

Every phrase, every paragraph, every story, every theme in Matthew’s Gospel reveals who Jesus is. Like the crowds who listened to his Sermon on the Mount, be astounded as his royal authority dawns on you. {Hearing the king (Matthew 7:28-29)}

In his article Hearing the king (Matthew 7:28-29) he gives an overview of what others say:

Craig Blomberg, Matthew, New American Commentary (Nashville: B & H, 1992), 134–135:

Strikingly, Jesus quotes Scripture in his sermon only to reinterpret it, he cites no human authorities or tradition, and he speaks with directness and confidence that he himself is bringing God’s message for a new era in human history. Such preaching reflects either the height of presumption and heresy or the fact that he was a true spokesman for God, whom we dare not ignore.

R. T. France, The Gospel of Matthew, New International Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2007), 298–299:

To set the authority of his teaching in contrast with that of the scribes is a bold claim, since the scribes were the authorized teachers of the law who in virtue of their training and office had a right to expect the people to accept their legal rulings. … Whereas scribal rulings were based on the tradition of earlier interpreters of the law, Jesus has in 5:17–48 set himself up as an authority over against that interpretive tradition, on the basis not of a formal training or authorization but of his own confident, “I tell you.” … When to that remarkable claim is added Jesus’ assumption that he himself is the proper object of people’s allegiance and the arbiter of their destiny (5:11–12; 7:21–23, 24, 26), the crowd’s astonishment is hardly out of place. W. D. Davies’ comment … “The Sermon on the Mount compels us, in the first place, to ask who he is who utters these words.”

John R. W. Stott, The Message of the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7): Christian Counter-Culture, The Bible Speaks Today (Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 1985), 216:

In the Sermon on the Mount there are five direct references to God’s kingdom. They imply—though with varying degrees of clarity—that he himself had inaugurated it, and that he had authority to admit people into it and to bestow on them its blessings.

Today Jesus is not here any more, but the apostles took care we can read Jeshua’s words

Richard A. Burridge, Four Gospels, One Jesus? A Symbolic Reading (London: SPCK, 2005), 21:

The gospels invite readers to enter their world, to listen to Jesus’ words, to watch his great deeds, to appreciate their understanding of him, and to ask ourselves the same questions as the people in the text: ‘who is this man?’ (Mk. 4:41)

StGeorgeMonasteryToday lots more people than in Jeshua’s time can hear the words of that incredible special man. Lots more people should come to hear those words about how man has to relate to their Divine Maker. The son of the Divine Maker God explained  his heavenly Father‘s Words and showed us how man can and/or has to respond to the Kingdom message.

Jesus called Israel to become the kingdom built on God — the solid Rock who endures forever, not the shifting sands of human kingdoms that last only for a season. How foolish to spend our lives promoting human powers when all our efforts will be swept away. Instead, spend your life for God’s reign through Messiah Jesus: the only thing that endures. {A rock worth building on (Matthew 7:24-27)}

Jesus is the focus of God’s eternal plan to re-establish His reign over the earth. Our hope should be in Jesus, the son of God, so quit playing politics with earthly powers that will fall. Build all your efforts on the only rock that will last:

the ruler God has appointed, the only one who can save human society.

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Preceding articles

The Nazarene master teacher learning people how they should behave

Matthew 7:1-11 – The Nazarene’s Commentary on Neighbor Love Continued 7: Matthew 7:1-5 Judgment and neighbor love

Matthew 7:12 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Summary on the Torah’s Fulfillment

Matthew 7:13-14 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #1 The Narrow Gate and the way to destruction

Matthew 7:15-20 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #2 False prophets and fruitage

Matthew 7:13-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #3 Matthew 7:21-23 The ones Jesus never knew

Matthew 7:13-27 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #4 Matthew 7:24-27 – Conclusion

Matthew 7:13-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #5 Matthew 7:28-29 – The Crowd’s Reaction

Authority from the One God to one mediator between God and men

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Additional reading

  1. Entrance of a king to question our position #2 Who do we want to see and to be
  2. Hearing words to accept
  3. Priest, scribes and others with authority
  4. Gain Christ, trusting Jehovah
  5. Witnesses of Christ and of his gospel
  6. The Mountain: Radical Obedience

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Further reading

  1. By what authority?
  2. “The authority of Jesus” by Thomas Schreiner
  3. MS Week #3: Jesus’ Authority
  4. The Authority of Jesus
  5. Jesus’ Authority
  6. the unique authority of Jesus
  7. The Sermon on the Mount: Examining the Psychological and Sociological Implications
  8. Why Be Optimistic About the Future of the Gospel?
  9. Are You Sure You Want to do This?
  10. The Kingdom Of God: Luke’s Gospel
  11. The Kingdom Needs You!
  12. ​Extremism: Does Lord Jesus Really Expect Us To Go This Far?

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The Eccentric Fundamentalist

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