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Posts tagged ‘Parable of the Field and the Harvest’

A Look of the Expositor Bible at The Marriage Feast {Matthew 22:1-14 }

The Marriage Feast. {#Mt 22:1-14 }

The manner in which this third parable is introduced leaves room for doubt whether it was spoken in immediate connection with the two preceding. The use of the word “answered” (ver. 1) would rather suggest the idea that some conversation not reported had intervened. But though it does not form part of a continuous discourse with the others, it is so closely connected with them in scope and bearing that it may appropriately be dealt with, as concluding the warning called forth by the first attack of the chief priests and elders. The relation between the three parables will be best seen by observing that the first has to do with their treatment of John; the second and third with their treatment of Himself and His apostles. The second and third differ from each other in this: that while the King’s Son, Who is prominent in both, is regarded in the former as the last and greatest of a long series of heavenly messengers sent to demand of the chosen people the fruits of righteousness, in the latter He is presented, not as demanding righteousness, but as bringing joy. Duty is the leading thought of the second parable, privilege of the third; in the one sin is brought home to Israel’s leaders by setting before them their treatment of the messengers of righteousness, in the other the sin lies in their rejection of the message of grace. Out of this distinction rises another—viz., that while the second parable runs back into the past, upwards along the line of the Old Testament prophets, the third runs down into the future, into the history of the apostolic times. The two together make up a terrible indictment, which might well have roused these slumbering consciences, and led even scribes and Pharisees to shrink from filling up the measure of their iniquities.

A word may be necessary as to the relation of this parable to the similar one recorded in the fourteenth chapter of St. Luke, known as “The parable of the Great Supper.” The two have many features in common, but the differences are so great that it is plainly wrong to suppose them to be different versions of the same. It: is astonishing to see what needless difficulties some people make for themselves by the utterly groundless assumption that our Lord would never use the same illustration a second time. Why should He not have spoken of. the gospel as a feast, not twice merely, but fifty times? There would, no doubt, be many variations in His manner of unfolding the thought, according to the circumstances, the audience, the particular object in view at the time; but to suppose that because He had used that illustration in Galilee He must be forbidden from reverting to it in Judea is a specimen of what we may call the insanity of those who are ever on the watch for their favourite “discrepancies.” In this case there is not only much variation in detail, but the scope of the two parables is quite different, the former having more the character of a pressing invitation, with only a suggestion of warning at the close; whereas the one before us, while preserving all the grace of the gospel as suggested by the figure of a feast to which men are freely invited, and even heightening its attractiveness inasmuch as it is a wedding feast—the most joyful of all festivities—and a royal one too, yet has throughout the same sad tone of judgment which has been characteristic of all these three parables, and is at once seen to be specially appropriate to the fateful occasion on which they were spoken.

As essentially a New Testament parable, it begins with the familiar formula “The kingdom of heaven is like.” The two previous parables had led up to the new dispensation; but: this one begins with it, and is wholly concerned with it. The King’s Son appears now, not as a messenger, but as a bridegroom. It was not the first time that Jesus had spoken of Himself as a bridegroom, or rather as the Bridegroom. The thought was a familiar one in the prophets of the Old Testament, the Bridegroom, be it remembered, being none other than Jehovah Himself. Consider, then, what it meant that Jesus should without hesitation or explanation. speak of Himself as the Bridegroom. And let. us not imagine that He simply took the figure, and applied it to Himself as fulfilling prophecy; let us not fail to realise that He entered fully into its tender meaning. When we think of the circumstances in which this parable was spoken we have here a most pathetic glimpse into the sanctuary of our Saviour’s loving heart. Let us. try with reverent sympathy to enter into the feeling of the King’s Son, come from heaven to seek humanity for His bride, to woo and to win her from the cruel bondage of sin and death, to take her into union with Himself, so that she may share with Him the liberty and wealth, the purity and joy, the glory and the hope of the heavenly kingdom! The King “made a marriage for His Son”—where is the bride? what response is she making to the Bridegroom’s suit? A marriage for His Son! On Calvary?

It must have been very hard for Him to go on; but He will keep down the rising tide of emotion, that He may set before this people and before all people another attractive picture of the kingdom of heaven. He will give even these despisers of the heavenly grace another opportunity to reconsider their position. So He tells of the invitations sent out first to “them that were bidden”— i.e., to the chosen people who had been especially invited from the earliest times, and to whom, when the fulness of the time had come, the call was first addressed. “And they would not come.” There is no reference to the aggravations which had found place in the former parable. {#Mt 21:39 } These were connected not so much with the offer of grace, which is the main purport of this parable, as with the demand for fruit, which was the leading thought of the one before. It was enough, then, in describing how they dealt with the invitation, to say, “They would not come”; and, indeed, this refusal hurt Him far more than their buffets and their blows. When He is buffeted He is silent, sheds no tears, utters no wail; His tears and lamentation are reserved for them: “How often would I, have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!” “They would not come.”

But the love of the King and of His Son is not yet exhausted. A second invitation is sent, with greater urgency than before, and with fuller representations of the great preparations which had been made for the entertainment of the guests: “Again, he sent forth other servants, saying, Tell them which are bidden, Behold, I have prepared my dinner: my oxen and my fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come unto the marriage.” As the first invitation was that which had been already given and which they were now rejecting, the second refers to that fuller proclamation of the gospel which was yet to be made after the work of the Bride-groom-Redeemer should be finished when it could be said, as not before: “All things are ready.”

In the account which follows, therefore, there is a foreshadowing of the treatment the apostles would afterwards receive. Many, indeed, were converted by their word, and took their places at the feast; but the people as a whole “made light of it, and went their ways, one to his farm, another to his merchandise: and the remnant took his servants, and entreated them spitefully, and slew them.” What was the consequence? Jerusalem, rejecting the gospel of the kingdom, even when it was “preached with the Holy Ghost sent down from heaven,” must be destroyed; and new guests must be sought among the nations that up till now had no especial invitation to the feast. This prophetic warning was conveyed in terms of the parable; yet there is a touch in it which shows how strongly the Saviour’s mind was running on the sad future of which the parable was but a picture: “When the king heard thereof, he was wroth: and he sent forth his armies, and destroyed those murderers, and burned up their city.” Why “city”? There had been no mention of a city in the parable. True; but Jerusalem was in the Saviour’s heart, and all the pathos of His lament over it is in that little word. “Their city” too, observe, -reminding us of “your house” at the close of this sad day. {#Mt 23:38 } In the same way the calling of the Gentiles is most skilfully brought within the scope of the parable, by the use of the peculiar word translated in the Revised Version—”the partings of the highways,” which seems to suggest the thought of the servants leaving the city precincts and going out in all directions along the main trunk roads to “the partings of the highways,” to carry the gospel to all without distinction, wherever could be found an ear of man to listen, or a human heart to welcome the King’s grace and the Bridegroom’s love. Thus, after all, the wedding was to be furnished with guests.

The parable, as we have seen, is one of grace; but righteousness too must find a place in it. The demand for fruits of righteousness is no less rigid in the new dispensation than it had been in the old. To make this clear and strong the parable of the Feast is followed by the pendant of the Wedding Garment.

There are two ways in which the heavenly marriage feast may be despised: first, by those who will not come at all; next, and no less, by those who try to snatch the wedding joy without the bridal purity. The same leading thought or motive is recognisable here as in the parable of the two sons. The man without the wedding garment corresponds to the son who said “I go, sir,” and went not, while those who refuse altogether correspond to the son who answered “I will not.” By bearing this in mind we can understand, what to many has been a serious difficulty—how it is that the punishment meted out to the offender in this second parable is so terribly severe. If we simply think of the parable itself, it does seem an extraordinary thing that so slight an offence as coming to a wedding feast without the regulation dress should meet with such an awful doom; but when we consider whom this man represents we can see the very best of reasons for it. Hypocrisy was his crime, than which there is nothing more utterly hateful in the sight of Him Who desireth truth in the inward parts. It is true that the representation does not at first seem to set the sin in so very strong a light; but when we think of it, we see that there was no other way in which it could be brought within the scope of this parable. It is worthy of notice, moreover, that the distinction between the intruder and the others is not observed till the king himself enters, which indicates that the difference between him and the others was no outward distinction, that the garment referred to is the invisible garment of-righteousness. To the common eye he looked like all the rest; but when the all-searching Eye is on the company he is at once detected and exposed. He is really worse than those who would not come at all. They were honest sinners; he was a hypocrite—at the feast with mouth and hand and eye, but not of it, for his spirit isnot robed in white: he is the black sheep in the fold; a despiser within, he is worse than the despisers without.

Even to him, indeed, the king has a kindly feeling. He calls him “Friend,” and gives him yet the opportunity to repent and cry for mercy. But he is speechless. False to the core, he has no rallying point within to fall back upon. All is confusion and despair. He cannot even pray. Nothing remains but to pronounce his final doom (ver. 13).

The words with which the parable closes (ver. 14) are sad and solemn. They have occasioned difficulty to some, who have supposed they were meant to teach that the number of the saved will be small. Their difficulty, like so many others, has been due to forgetfulness of the circumstances under which the words were spoken, and the strong emotion of which they were the expression. Jesus is looking back over the time since He began to spread the gospel feast, and thinking how many have been invited, and how few have come! And even among those who have seemed to come there are hypocrites! One He specially would have in mind as He spoke of the man without the wedding garment; for though we take him to be the type of a class, we can scarcely think that our Lord could fail to let His sad thoughts rest on Judas as He described that man. Taking all this into consideration we can well understand how at that time He should conclude His parable with the lamentation: “Many are called, but few chosen.” It did not follow that it was a truth for all time and for eternity. It was true for the time included in the scope of the parable. It was most sadly true of the Jewish nation then, and in the times which followed on immediately; but the day was coming, before all was done, when the heavenly Bridegroom, according to the sure word of prophecy, should “see of the travail of His soul, and be satisfied.” No creed article, therefore, have we here, but a cry from the sore heart of the heavenly Bridegroom, in the day of His sorrows, in the pain of unrequited love.

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Preceding

Matthew 22:1-6 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of Invitation to a Marriage

Matthew 22:7-10 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Invitations after City’s Destruction

Matthew 22:11-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: King’s Inspection and Marriage Garments

Matthew 22:14 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Many Invited – Few Chosen

Matthew 22:15-22 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Caesar’s Things and God’s Things

Matthew 22:23-28 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Sadducees Question on the Resurrection

Matthew 22:29-33 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Resurrection Proof from Moses

Matthew 22:34-40 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Which Is the Greatest Commandment

Matthew 22:41-46 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Jesus Asks a Trump Question

Additional readings to Matthew 22:41-46

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Additional reading

  1. Memorizing wonderfully 31 Son of David and God’s Kingdom
  2. Wilderness Transformed

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Related articles

  1. Twentieth week of ordinary time-cycle -I- Thursday-gospel-reading – Matthew 22:1-14
  2. The Lord’s Goodness – Two Souls, One Heart

Matthew 13:36-43 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Zizania in the Field Explained

Matthew 13:36-43 – Parable of the Zizania in the Field Explained

MT13:36 Then Jesus released the crowds[1] and came into the house. His disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the zizania of the field.”[2] MT13:37 Jesus responded by saying, “The One sowing the good seed is the Son of Humankind. MT13:38 The field is the world.[3] The good seed are the sons of the Realm;[4] but the zizania are the sons of the Evil One.[5] MT13:39 The enemy sowing them is the Devil.[6] The harvest is[7] the consummation of a period.[8] The reapers are angels.[9] MT13:40 So, even as the zizania are gathered[10] and burned in fire,[11] thus it will be at the consummation of the Period.[12] MT13:41 The Son of Humankind will send forth his angels[13] and they will cull out of his Realm[14] everything that causes scandal[15] and those doing lawlessness.[16] MT13:42 The angels will cast out[17] [the sons of the Evil One] into the furnace of fire. There will be lamentation[18] and grinding of teeth. MT13:43 Then the righteous[19] will shine forth like the sun[20] [Daniel 12:3] in the Realm of their Father. Let the one with ears, hear.”[21]

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[1] Released the crowds: Or, KJV: sent the multitude away; NWT: dismissed. One wonders how he did this.

[2] The parable of the zizania of the field: The disciples give us their title for the parable. We see also the critical point they wondered about.

[3] Field is the world: The Greek for “world” is KOSMOS and means something arranged in a certain order to characterize it. The whole world of humankind is the field of the Lord.

[4] Good seed are the sons of the Realm: Jesus has used the phrase “sons of the kingdom” earlier. In Matthew 8:12 these are children of Israel. The Nazarene tells that Jewish generation that the kingdom will be removed and given to another nation (Matthew 21:43). That nation proved to be a spiritual one identical to the Christian Church (1 Peter 2:5-9; Galatians 6:16). The “sons of the Realm” are the children of God within the realm of profession. Compare 2 Timothy 2:19.

[5] The sons of the Evil One: That is, children of the Devil. This distinction is made by Jesus in the writings of John (John 8:44; 1 John 3:10). According to the apostle John what primarily identifies the children of the Devil is hatred and lack of love (charity). On this matter compare Matthew 25:31-46.

[6] Enemy sowing them is the Devil: Like the fermenting leaven, the Devil is at work even within the Realm of the Son (2 Corinthians 11:3, 4, 14, 15).

[7] The harvest is: Is the harvest a generational period covering over a hundred years? Or, is it the end of a period that brings judgment?

[8] The consummation of a period: The whole phrase in Greek is TE SYNTELEIA TOU AIONOS. It is nearly identical to Matthew 24:3 (see notes) and Hebrews 9:26. The phrase is also rendered: KJV: the end of the world; TCNT: the close of the age; NWT: conclusion of the system of things. It seems the disciples draw their use in Matthew 24:3 from Daniel 9:26 where SYNTELEIAS occurs in the Jewish Greek Bible (LXX). Jerome translates SYNTELEIA by consumatis.

[9] Angels: Compare Matthew 24:30, 31 and Matthew 25:31 where angels attend the King when he arrives to judge his realm. This is the parousia-judgment. The Nazarene’s parables in Matthew chapters 24 and 25 also deal with this judgment of his own household of faith.

[10] The zizania are gathered: Note from the initial statement of the parable that the zizania were bound and burned “first.” That is, their judgment occurs before the “sons of the Realm” are seen within the Father’s Kingdom. The parousia-judgment is a time of judging the Church upon its resurrection. For, Paul says, “we must ALL stand before the judgment-seat of Christ.” (2 Corinthians 5:10) These are those “of Christ at his Parousia.” (1 Corinthians 15:23) Within the Household of Faith all professing Christians are resurrected to their judgment day upon the Return of Christ (Daniel 12:1, 2; John 5:28, 29). Those thus raised to judgment will have two outcomes: life or shame (Daniel 12:2; 1 John 2:28; 4:17). This is the truth taught by Jesus’ Parousia parables (Matthew 24, 25). Consider the word study on judgment day.

[11] Burned in fire: Compare Matthew 25:46. Consider word study on Gehenna.

[12] The consummation of the Period: Similar to the previous phrase but now with the article in Greek. This is the end of the Age or Period prior to the Return of Christ when the Harvest begins. It may also be the end of the Gospel Age or Age of the Church.

[13] Send forth his angels: Compare Matthew 24:31 and Matthew 25:31.

[14] Cull out of his Realm: Or, gather, collect out. There are certain undesirables within the Son’s Realm. Are they not the lawless of Matthew 7:21? Compare 2 Thessalonians 2:7-9.

[15] Causes scandal: The Greek is SCANDALA and is usually rendered: KJV: things that offend; ASV: cause stumbling; MOF: all who are hindrances; PME: spoiling; BECK: who lead others to do wrong. The history of the Church has been scandalous. These will meet their King with shame (1 John 2:28).

[16] Lawlessness: Compare Matthew 7:21. These break the two commandments of 1 John 3:23.

[17] Cast out: The Greek is related to the same word for exorcising demons.

[18] There will be lamentation: This will occur before the judgment-seat of Christ (2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 John 2:28).

[19] The righteous: Compare the “righteous” at Matthew 25:37. The “righteous” are contrasted to the “lawless” for righteousness is the same as being law-abiding. The key law is that of love expressed by charity and hospitality as the parable of Matthew 25:31-46 shows.

[20] Shine forth like the sun: The strong allusion is from Daniel 12:3. The “sons of the kingdom” have now become part of the Father’s Kingdom in heaven. Note this verse in Daniel follows upon the foretold “oppression” associated with the appearing of Michael (Daniel 12:1, 2 JBS; compare Matthew 24:30).

[21] Let the one with ears, hear: Compare notes on Matthew 13:9.

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Preceding

Matthew 7:13-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: The True Disciple #3 Matthew 7:21-23 The ones Jesus never knew

Matthew 8:5-13 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Servant of Army Officer Healed

Matthew 12:33-37 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Judgment Day

Matthew 13 – Parables on Kingdom mysteries

Matthew 13:1-9 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable: the Soil and the Seed

Matthew 13:10-15 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Why Speak in Parables?

Matthew 13:16-17 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Happy Eyes and Ears

Matthew 13:18-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Seed and Soil

Matthew 13:24-30 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Field and the Harvest

Matthew 13:31-32 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Mustard Seed

Matthew 13:33 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Fermented Whole

Matthew 13:34-35 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Manner of Teaching Foretold

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Additional reading

  1. Thanksgivukkah and Advent
  2. The Right One to follow and to worship
  3. Memorizing wonderfully 7 Exodus
  4. Looking for a spiritual new life
  5. Thought for September 8 Weak but standing strong in the ground swell
  6. Sayings of Jesus, what to believe and being or not of the devil
  7. Outflow of foundational relationship based on acceptance of Jesus
  8. The one who set the standard
  9. To whom do we want to be enslaved
  10. Not words of any organisation should bind you, but the Word of God
  11. Humility and the Fear of the Lord
  12. We all are changed into the same image from glory to glory
  13. We Are The Children Of God
  14. Christians remaining hidden not sharing the gospel
  15. Laboring in the Vineyard or Sitting on the Hillside with Jonah?

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Related

  1. Just a Thought
  2. The Judgment Seat of Christ
  3. The Gift of Today – April 11 – The Judgment Seat of Christ
  4. The Judgment Seat of Christ: Romans 2:1-2:16
  5. Revealed by Fire
  6. The BEMA Judgment Seat of Christ – Our Rewards
  7. Stuck! Ten Areas That Will Bury You as a Believer and How to Dig Your Way Out! (Area #7- Success) (con’t)
  8. My reward is with me – Revelation 22:12
  9. Judgment Seat of Christ Series #7 – Part 144 of Riddles, Enigmas & Esoteric Imagery of Revelation
  10. God’s accessment of our work (of our lives)
  11. Be Sheep Not Goats! The Son of Man Will Judge the Nations
  12. Children of the Devil.
  13. Jesus was numbered with the transgressors that his sheep might be numbered amongst the children of God
  14. How shall I put thee among the children

Matthew 13:24-30 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Field and the Harvest

Matthew 13:24-30 – Parable of the Field and the Harvest

MT13:24 Another parable Jesus put before them, saying, “The Realm of Heaven[1] may be compared to[2] a man sowing good seed in his field. MT13:25 But, while men were sleeping his enemy arrived and over-seeded zizania[3] among the wheat and then left. MT13:26 Now when the [wheat] sprouted and produced fruitage there also appeared the zizania. MT13:27 So, the slaves approached the landlord[4] and asked him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field?’ MT13:28 The landlord answered them, ‘An enemy did this.’ The slaves asked, ‘Do you want us to go and cull-out[5] the zizania?’ MT13:29 But, the landlord told them, ‘No, for by accident while culling the zizania you uproot the wheat also.[6] MT13:30 Go and let both of them grow together until the harvest. Then in the harvest season I will tell the harvesters,[7] “Gather first the zizania and bind them into bundles to be burned. But, the wheat gather into my storehouse.”’”[8]

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[1] Realm of Heaven: Not the seat of government, but the realm or domain over which the King reigns: the realm of profession – the Church. See notes on Matthew 10:9 and Matthew 13:11. Research the word group kingdom.

[2] May be compared to: Or, KJV: is likened unto. Jesus is to use several parables to illustrate truths or mysteries about the Congregation (or, Church) he is to build (Matthew 16:18). Compare Ephesians 1:19-22 and Colossians 1:13. The Nazarene is to explain this parable a bit later. So see details in Matthew 13:36-43.

[3] Zizania: Generally this plant (Lolium temulentum) is called either tares or the “bearded darnel.” (KJV) Or, MOF: weeds. When young it resembles wheat but with maturity it turns black and stands up straight, while wheat is golden and bows its head (See Bible dictionaries). William Barclay observes: “The tares and the wheat are so like each other that the Jews called the tares bastard wheat. The Hebrew for tares is zunim, whence comes the Greek ZIZANION; zunim is said to be connected with the word zanah, which means to commit fornication.”

[4] Landlord: Or, KJV: householder; TCNT: owner’s; WEY: farmer’s. The Greek is OIKO(=house)DESPOTOU(=lord).

[5] Cull-out: Or, KJV: gather them up; UBSInt: collect.

[6] For by accident while culling the zizania you uproot the wheat also: KJV: lest while ye gather up the tares, ye root up also the wheat with them.

[7] Harvesters: Or, KJV: reapers.

[8] Storehouse: Or, KJV: barn; MOF: granary.

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Preceding

Matthew 13 – Parables on Kingdom mysteries

Matthew 13:1-9 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable: the Soil and the Seed

Matthew 13:10-15 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Why Speak in Parables?

Matthew 13:16-17 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Happy Eyes and Ears

Matthew 13:18-23 – The Nazarene’s Commentary: Parable of the Seed and Soil

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Additional reading

  1. Careful what you sow, it might grow
  2. Sow and harvests in the garden of your heart
  3. Being fit to take care of a garden
  4. Seeds and weeds for being the greatest nation
  5. Seeds, weeds and kingdoms
  6. Seeds from the world creating division and separation from God

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Related
  1. A Reflection for Friday 22 December 2017
  2. Judging: Above Our Paygrade
  3. Wheat and Weeds
  4. Being a Weed in a World Full of Roundup
  5. 7th Sunday after Pentecost: 23 July – Matthew 13: 24-43 ~ God will sort it all out

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